My Asylum Case Is Delayed; What Can I Do?

by Jason Dzubow on February 26, 2015

These days, I feel a bit like a broken record: Delay, delay, delay. It’s all I seem to write about (and what I spend much of my work day dealing with). But it is the big issue with asylum cases, both in the Asylum Office and the Immigration Court, and so it is on everyone’s mind. Today I want to talk about delay at the Asylum Office and what can be done about it.

Yipee! Asylum cases filed during the Jurassic period are now being interviewed.

Yipee! Asylum cases filed during the Jurassic period are now being interviewed.

Most recently, the Asylum Office changed its policy and is now interviewing old cases before new cases. This means that new cases will probably take one to two years before the interview. Previously-filed cases will be interviewed in the order that they were received by the Asylum Office. Our oldest backlog cases–filed in April 2013–have just been scheduled for interviews, so we are starting to see the effect of the new policy.

Anyway, let’s get to it. If your case is delayed, what can you do about it? There are several actions you can take to try to get a faster interview date. None of them is guaranteed to work, but–depending on your circumstances–some may be worth a try.

Short List: You can put your case on the “short list.” The short list is a list of people who will be contacted for an interview if another case is canceled. In my local Asylum Office (Virginia), there are approximately 250 cases on the short list. The Asylum Office interviews about 10 such cases per month, so the “short list” is not very short or very fast. When your name is called, you may not have much notice before the interview (for example, the Asylum Office could call you today and tell you to appear for an interview tomorrow). For this reason, when you put your name on the short list, your case should be complete and all documents should be submitted. This is particularly crucial if your Asylum Office–like mine–requires all documents to be submitted at least one week prior to the interview.

Once your name is on the short list, the Asylum Office will eventually contact you for an interview. In the event that you are called, but cannot attend, there is no penalty. However, your name will go to the back of the line, so probably you will not be called again for some time.

The bottom line here is that the short list may be a way to get an earlier interview date, but it is not all that fast. So it is certainly not a perfect solution. On the other hand, there really is no downside to putting your name on the short list, so if you would like to move your case faster, this is a good first step.

Request to Expedite: If you have a medical, family, professional, or other emergency or need, you can ask the Asylum Office to expedite your case. We have had mixed luck with this option. We’ve tried to expedite for several people where they had family members overseas who were facing problems. For most of these cases, the Asylum Office did not expedite, but for a few, it did. We were able to expedite a case where the client had cancer. We’ve also had luck expediting a case where the client needed to obtain status for professional reasons. In short, our success at expediting cases seems to have little relationship to the seriousness of the client’s problem.

If you want to expedite your case, you need to contact the Asylum Office and ask to expedite. You need to explain why you want to expedite and include some evidence–such as a doctor’s note–about the reason you want the case expedited. Again, we’ve had very mixed success with getting our clients’ cases expedited, but there really is no down side to trying.

Congress: You can contact your local Congressional Representative to ask for help with your case. You can find contact information for your local Representative here and for your state’s Senators here. Generally, in my experience, this option has not been effective at getting a faster interview date, but there is no harm in trying. If you have a U.S. citizen friend (or church group or other group) who can make this request for you, it may be more effective.

DHS Ombudsman: You can inquire with the DHS Ombudsman’s office about your case. This office exists to assist people who have problem cases. The Ombudsman’s website is here. I have a high opinion of the Ombudsman’s office, and they do want to help, but I think their ability to make cases go faster is very limited. I doubt they will be able to help make a case faster under ordinary circumstances. But perhaps if you have tried to expedite due to an emergency, and you have not had success, they could assist you.

Mandamus: You can file a Mandamus lawsuit against the Asylum Office. In a Mandamus lawsuit, you sue the Asylum Office and ask the Judge to order the Asylum Office to do its job (process your case). I have never done this, but I have heard about some applicants successfully suing the Asylum Office. Generally, the Asylum Office will not want to waste resources fighting Mandamus suits, so they might agree to process the case rather than fight the lawsuit. As I see it, the two downsides to this are: (1) There is not a strong legal basis to force the Asylum Office to process a person’s case. The regulations generally require asylum cases to be processed in less than six months, but there are broad exceptions to this time frame, and the Asylum Office can rely on those exceptions to process cases more slowly. Although the suits may not be very strong legally, they can still succeed where the Asylum Office would rather interview the applicant than fight the lawsuit; and (2) It can be expensive to hire an attorney to process a Mandamus lawsuit. For applicants who can afford this approach, however, it might offer a way to make things faster (though it will surely not enamor you to the Asylum Office). 

To learn more about your options, you may want to contact your local Asylum Office. Contact information about your office can be found here. There is no magic solution to delay at the Asylum Office, but I hope that some of these suggestions will be helpful. If you have had success with these or other ideas, please let us know.

{ 70 comments… read them below or add one }

Diana April 26, 2017 at 8:49 am

Hello, Jason
My husband filed a asylum application with my son and I as dependents in 2015. We all went through the fingerprint process. However, the case is stilling pending. My son is a college student right now with a valid F1 visa which will expire several years later. He does not applied the EAD(C8) up to now. May he travel outside U.S without applying Advanced Parole and re-enter US with his valid visa, I 20 and passport?

I know some people with same situation who traveled abroad and went back safely. I am wondering under what circumstance the entry officer let them re-enter. Did the officer know that this visitor is a pending asylum applicant or they did not learn the situation at all upon the information they got at the entry port.
Does leaving and re-entering U.S with other visa mean losing the status as a dependent of asylum application?

Thank you so much in advance for your time and effort to help us.

Diana

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Jason Dzubow April 28, 2017 at 4:48 pm

Asylum is a request to stay in the US, but to get a student visa, you have to agree to leave the US when your studies are done, so these two applications are in conflict. If he leaves the US, it is certainly possible that he will not be able to return (or that he will be detained when he gets to the airport and will have to ask for asylum there – and probably do his own case while detained). So in short, I think it is very bad idea to travel without Advance Parole. I have clients who have done that too (without telling me in advance) and they have returned. Things are tougher now under Trump, and I would not depend on luck (or an anecdote from a friend) – let him apply for AP and if he travels, use the AP to re-enter the country. Take care, Jason

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Diana April 30, 2017 at 12:31 am

Jason, thank you so much for your prompt and helpful advice.

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Emmy April 24, 2017 at 5:07 pm

Hi Jason,
I am on F1 and my husband and son are dependent on me F2. My husband applied for asylum. I am on Opt currently which will end in 7 months. My question is after Opt can I go back to school and renew my I-20 to be in the F1 status, will there be a problem since our asylum is pending.
My second question we don’t know how much time it will take for asylum interview can my son after 2 years apply for his F1 since he will be joining the college and want him to maintain the status aswell. I am very stressed thinking that we will be out of status after filing asylum. we don’t want to be out of status. please advice.

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Jason Dzubow April 28, 2017 at 3:08 pm

If you do not leave the US, you probably will be able to return to school and keep your F-1 valid. If you plan to leave the US and get a new F-1 visa overseas, that could be a problem, since student visas are normally not issued to people if the embassy believes the person will try to remain permanently in the US (they are supposed to study and then leave). You may want to talk to your school, and maybe a lawyer, about this, especially if you want to leave the US. If you have asylum pending, you are lawfully here, but you have no status (this is confusing, but that is the law). If your son can stay in F-2 and then later switch to F-1 (probably all without leaving the US), maybe that would work. But if he leaves the US, that could probably be a problem. Of course, if he cannot maintain student status, he car remain here with asylum pending and still attend school using his EAD. Take care, Jason

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emmy April 28, 2017 at 3:52 pm

Thanks alot, I appreciate your timely advise.

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Vanessa Delva April 23, 2017 at 10:32 pm

Hi Jason ,my mom ,my 3 brothers and I came here together and apllied dor asylum in June 2014. My big brother and I applied separately because we were o st 21 y/o .My mom applied for herself and added my 2 little brothers as dependant who were 10 and 12 y/o at the moment.I was the only one who received an invitation for an interview, luckily I was granted asylum but the rest of my family’s been waiting since then ,they did not even receive an invitation to get fingerprinted.They all applied for Ead which they received. Now I’m really worried my little brothers are getting big and are in highschool,the eldest is almost graduated, I don’t know how to afford college or university since they haven’t received any legal documents. Any suggestions? Mind you ,we came from the same household ,it makes me really sad

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Jason Dzubow April 25, 2017 at 10:54 pm

You can check the Asylum Office Scheduling Bulletin (a link is at right) to get an idea of when the interview will be. If you missed the date, you can contact the asylum office to ask. You can find their contact info if you follow the link at right called Asylum Office Locator. Take care, Jason

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save April 22, 2017 at 12:26 pm

I have applied for asylum IN JUNE 2014 AT HOUSTON OFFICE, STILL MY CASE IS PENDING WAITING FOR THE INTERVIEW.MEAN WHILE I GOT 2 KIDS BORN OVER HERE.ALSO, I AM A NURSE & receiving MY EAD cards yearly .I don not have any status therefore worried about new policies & unable to continue university .Do you know how long it will take to call for an interview.

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Jason Dzubow April 25, 2017 at 8:35 am

I do not know. You can check the Asylum Office Scheduling Bulletin to get some idea – a link is at right. Also, you may be able to expedite (if you have a reason) or put your name on a “short list” if the TX asylum office has such a list. Contact them to ask. You can find their contact info if you follow the link at right called Asylum Office Locator. Take care, Jason

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Mohamed April 21, 2017 at 5:48 am

Hi jason
I have one question i need to advance pro to travel to see my wife in other counteryi am allready asyelm in dec 2016
This idea any dengerace coz not seen my wife more than year

Thanks

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Jason Dzubow April 21, 2017 at 6:27 am

If you have asylum, you do not need AP. You should get a Refugee Travel Document, available at http://www.uscis.gov. This allows you to travel and return to the US. Take care, Jason

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Luis April 15, 2017 at 6:23 pm

Hi, I started my asylum process in January 2015 with an address in Florida, I moved for 6 months to North Carolina and I’m going back to Florida. Is there any problem with these changes of address? How long does it take for the first interview? Thank you for your attention.

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Jason Dzubow April 16, 2017 at 8:02 am

There should be no problem. You can get an idea about interview wait times if you check the Asylum Office Scheduling Bulletin – a link is at right. Take care, Jason

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Lika April 13, 2017 at 3:26 am

Hi. We are on the island of Guam,asylum pending.May we move to the USA.And to expect an interview there?

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Jason Dzubow April 13, 2017 at 10:06 pm

That, I do not know. There are different rules for Guam and asylum (though maybe now they are the same as the rules for the continental US). Check with an immigration lawyer in Guam; maybe they would know. Good luck, Jason

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Lika April 13, 2017 at 11:18 pm

Thank you Jason.

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Jack dorsey April 11, 2017 at 10:00 am

Hi Jason,when a case pends for long before a final hearing at the immigration court does it weaken the case,I have a case since 2015 that has been set for 2019 and I’m afraid all the time gap will weaken the strength of the case maybe due to probable changed circumstances in country

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Jason Dzubow April 12, 2017 at 3:18 pm

Usually not, but it depends on the case. If country conditions improve, your case will be weaker. Also, sometimes you need to explain why you still face a danger in your country after you have not been back there for so long. Take care, Jason

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SV April 11, 2017 at 9:49 am

Hi, Jason,I finished interview last week.the officer told me I need to come back in two weeks to get the decision. but i have not received my fingerprint notice. So my question is, can i still get the decision in the office in two weeks?

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Jason Dzubow April 12, 2017 at 3:16 pm

If you were never fingerprinted, that could be a problem, but hopefully, you were fingerprinted when you first applied for asylum, and then you should be fine. Be aware that in many cases, the officer tells you to return in two weeks, but then the decision is not ready (usually, they call you beforehand). Hopefully, you will get the decision in 2 weeks, but you have to remain patient in case it is not ready. Good luck, Jason

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SV April 12, 2017 at 9:57 pm

thank you jason, I took fingerprint 2years ago. hope I can get the decision.

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ibrahim mohammed April 7, 2017 at 6:26 pm

Hi
I applied fir asylum in 9/2014 and i made the interview in 2/2015 and till now i didn’t recieve any decision from the asylum office, and when i went to the office and met the supervisor she said to me it still pending , is there any thing i can do.
Thank you in advance.

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Jason Dzubow April 9, 2017 at 8:14 am

There is not much you can do. I outlined some ideas in the article above. The most drastic solution is the mandamus lawsuit, but you would need to talk to a lawyer before you tried that. For the most part, the only thing you can really do is wait and every few months contact the asylum office for updates (which are usually pretty vague, as in your case). Take care, Jason

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Jean Roody April 3, 2017 at 1:03 am

Hello,
I have a friend who is not a cityzen,he is living in USA, but he has the green card, he applied for his daughter in Haiti in order to give her the residence.his daughter is 26 years old. How long will they take to call her for the residence.
Thanks in advance for your answer!
Jean Roody.

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Jason Dzubow April 4, 2017 at 6:40 am

Sorry, I can only answer asylum questions here. The person can Google the Department of State Visa Bulletin and get an idea about that. Take care, Jason

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KG April 1, 2017 at 10:22 pm

Hello Jason,
I did my asylum interview before 3 months and I haven’t received my decision yet. But yesterday the asylum office sent me the following email, I am sending you as it is. Please tell me what “under Review” means and does it tell anything about the decision outcome?
here is the email below
“Your file is undergoing review prior to a decision being rendered.  We are unable to estimate when the review will be completed.
 We have forwarded your email to the reviewing supervisor so that he is aware of your inquiry”.
Your reply is appreciate as usual!

Reply

Jason Dzubow April 4, 2017 at 6:28 am

It could mean different things. It may have been sent to headquarters (average wait time there is about a 10 months, I think). More likely, it is under supervisor review, which I believe happens to every case. My opinion is that the email does not tell you much; just that they are working on your case, and they have not given any time frame for completion. Take care, Jason

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KG April 5, 2017 at 2:26 pm

Thanks Jason,
I think it is a supervisor review.
Do all Denied and granted cases undergo supervisor review?

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Jason Dzubow April 7, 2017 at 6:12 am

Every case is reviewed by a supervisor, but I do not know whether they call it “supervisor review”. I think the answer “your case is under supervisor review” is pretty standard, and does not tell you a whole lot. Take care, Jason

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KG April 7, 2017 at 2:10 pm

Thanks Jason! I really appreciate your reply.
God bless you for what you are doing!!

Adam March 29, 2017 at 4:09 pm

Hello Jason,
I got an update from USCIS saying that my application is queued for scheduling. I have filed my application in june 2014. Do you have an assumption or guess when i might get the interview.
Thanks

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Jason Dzubow March 30, 2017 at 6:20 am

I do not know, but if they sent you that message, you should make sure all your evidence is submitted and that you are ready for the interview when they call you. Take care, Jason

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Adam March 31, 2017 at 12:42 am

Thanks Jason,
How long it takes after the interview to know if my case is accepted or denied? and if i got accepted how long it takes to get the Green card.
Thanks again

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Jason Dzubow March 31, 2017 at 6:44 am

After the interview for asylum, you can get a decision quickly or it can take years. Once you have asylum, you have to wait one year, and then you can apply for a GC. Take care, Jason

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Jean Roody March 28, 2017 at 9:02 am

Hello,
Can a person have GRANT to go to school while his case is pending?
Thanks in advance foryour answer.
Jean Roody!

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Jason Dzubow March 29, 2017 at 6:10 am

If you are talking about grant money to attend school, you will need to ask the school itself. There are all types of grants and maybe you can qualify for one. As for asylum seekers, normally, if they have their EAD, they are eligible to attend school. And in some places, they can attend even without the EAD – you have to ask the school. Take care, Jason

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James Ye March 27, 2017 at 5:12 pm

can I go to school while my asylum case is pending

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Jason Dzubow March 27, 2017 at 6:40 pm

If you are talking about high school – you can. If you are talking about university, you have to ask the school, and many schools will not allow people to attend unless they have the work permit. But talk to the school, as each school and each state is different. Take care, Jason

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James Ye March 27, 2017 at 2:37 pm

Hello jason

Can I study while my asylum application is pending ?

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Jason Dzubow March 27, 2017 at 6:38 pm

If you are talking about high school – you can. If you are talking about university, you have to ask the school, and many schools will not allow people to attend unless they have the work permit. But talk to the school, as each school and each state is different. Take care, Jason

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Jean Roody March 24, 2017 at 12:06 am

Hello,
If i change my asylum case to another State, is there something wrong that might happen to my case?
Thanks in advance for your answer.
Jean Roody!

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Jason Dzubow March 24, 2017 at 6:47 am

If you move to another state, it could cause your case to move to another asylum office, but that should be fine and you should keep your place in the queue. You may want to email the old and new asylum offices to make sure your case moves and that you keep your place in line. You can find their contact info if you follow the link at right called Asylum Office Locator. Take care, Jason

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HAMID March 23, 2017 at 1:52 am

Dear Jason

I applied for asylum since 120 days ago and I’m applying for SSN after work permit
So I want to know how I can get SSN for my children without work permit?(because usually children don’t need work permit)

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Jason Dzubow March 23, 2017 at 6:36 am

You have to wait 150 days after you filed for asylum to apply for the work permit. As for the SSN, you will have to ask the Social Security office about that. Take care, Jason

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Pravin March 23, 2017 at 1:22 am

Hello jason

i applied for my asylum in feb 10,2017 and i received my application form on march 4…And till now i haven’t received any mail for my biometrics…so I’m really worried whether i should wait or go for infopass and let them i haven’t received anything for biometrics till now?if i dont have my fingerprints done,am i eligible to apply for work permit?how long is the minimum and maximum time to wait for biometrics after receiving the application?need a suggestion..
thank you in advance:)

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Jason Dzubow March 23, 2017 at 6:35 am

It is too soon to worry. If you got your receipt, you should be fine. If you do not have the biometrics in another 3 weeks, contact the local asylum office and ask about that. You can find their contact info if you follow the link at right called Asylum Office Locator. Take care, Jason

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Marianne March 21, 2017 at 9:33 pm

Hello Jason
Thank you so much for bringing light to this issue. I applied for asylum in January 2015 and I want to inquire on travel using advance parole to outside the USA as I wait for an interview date. Will I be granted a travel document or travelling as my case is pending will severely affect my asylum applicant status?

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Jason Dzubow March 22, 2017 at 6:18 am

If you apply for Advance Parole (form I-131, available at http://www.uscis.gov), you should be able to leave and return safely to the US. If you are from a “banned” country, you should talk to a lawyer before you try this, as you may have trouble returning. This is also true if you have criminal conviction or an immigration violation. Take care, Jason

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Shad April 4, 2017 at 4:01 am

Hello Jason Dzubow,
thank you very much for all of your explanations, in case I was filing asylum 9 months ago and want to apply for advanced parole in order to travel to my original country,
does it have a negative impact on my asylum case?

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Jason Dzubow April 4, 2017 at 2:28 pm

If you travel to the country where you fear persecution, it is very likely to result in your asylum case being denied. At the minimum, you will need a good explanation for why you returned to the country where you say you will be harmed. Take care, Jason

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N. Kay March 20, 2017 at 8:06 pm

Do the short list and expedition apply to cases already transferred to immigration court?

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Jason Dzubow March 21, 2017 at 3:37 pm

No, only to cases in the Asylum Office. Take care, Jason

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N. Kay March 20, 2017 at 7:57 pm

Dear Sir
My husband and I applied for asylum in 2013 and got denied then we reapplied within 1 year providing more evidenceso and documents to support our case, in the second interview the officer couldn’t make a decision so our case transfered to immigration court and scheduled for a master hearing in Jun 2015 and then individual hearing in Dec 2016 unfortunately postponed until 2019 my question is are we considered illegal immigrants? Knowing that we have work permits and social security numbers and we hold good jobs?

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Jason Dzubow March 21, 2017 at 3:36 pm

“Illegal immigrant” is not a term in immigration law, and so I cannot answer the question. It is just a term used by non-lawyers and it has no meaning under the law. You are allowed to be in the US until your case is resolved. Take care, Jason

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Qay March 18, 2017 at 6:41 pm

Hey jason
I have a question
If I wanna move to another state Is it okay?
Will it affect my case ?
Will it be delayed or its okay?
My case is since December 2014 and until now no interview
I’m a doctor is it good for my case ,
Cause I heard someone saying that people with high education has a good chance ?
Is it true

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Jason Dzubow March 19, 2017 at 10:58 am

If you move and the move causes your case to transfer to another asylum office, you should keep your place in the queue. You may need to email the old and new offices to make sure this happens, but it should be ok. You can find their contact info and email if you follow the link at right called Asylum Office Locator. As for education, a more educated person is better able to understand the system and present a case, which is an advantage, but other than that, education has no effect on an asylum case. Take care, Jason

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Bleble March 16, 2017 at 3:38 pm

Hello Jason
Thanks for all that you do for taking time out to read and respond to our sad minds…I applied for asylum in 2016 and I did not include my spice but now in 2017 I sent his paper work and with the ups update the asylum office received it but I have not gotten any response from them.again my mum is a us citizen can she petition for me?or can she petition for my spice and me?and if she can how long do you think it takes to get a change of status …thanks alot

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Jason Dzubow March 17, 2017 at 12:21 pm

If your mother is a US citizen, she can petition for you and your spouse, but there is a long waiting period and most likely, you would have to leave the US to get your green card outside the country. This may or may not be possible, so you would need to talk to a lawyer before you try it. You should be able to add your spouse to your asylum application. Contact the asylum office to ask whether our spouse has been added. The spouse can then apply for an EAD at the same time as when you are eligible. Take care, Jason

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DJ March 15, 2017 at 8:45 pm

Hi Jason,

USCIS denied my expedite request. I’m very disappointed by the decision. We provided medical documentation from my doctor and he outlined severe health risks. I reached out to the Ombudsman’s office but they provided me with the same response USCIS provided me. I need urgent action unless I will potentially suffer devastating health and financial damage. Do you have any suggestions on what I can do or an office that help me look into this issue?

Thanks!

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Jason Dzubow March 16, 2017 at 6:23 am

The expedite process is not very well developed, and some expedite requests that are very strong get denied (I do not know why). You can always make a new expedite request and explain the urgency of the situation. I suppose you can ask a Congressman for help, or if you are friends with US citizens, maybe they can ask the Congressman or write the asylum office on your behalf. Maybe go to the press. There is no easy solution. Good luck, Jason

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A March 14, 2017 at 9:13 pm

Dear Jason. Thank you for this website and everything you do. I have filed for asylum they received my application on 02/27/2017 and i received the receipt. But still nothing about biometric appointment. How long until i can enquire or what am i supposed to do? I am worried if the mail lost the appointment letter it might affect asylum clock. Also i hace included my spouse but on the receipt i have received only an alien number for me not for my spouse. What do you think? Thank you

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Jason Dzubow March 15, 2017 at 6:33 am

You should get the fingerprints soon; it often takes more than a month. You should get prints for your spouse as well (assuming she was included as a dependent in your case). If not, you can contact the asylum office to ask, but it is too soon to do that now. You can find their contact info if you follow the link at right called Asylum Office Locator. Take care, Jason

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A March 15, 2017 at 9:39 am

Yes sir i included my spouse on the application. But when i received the recipt they created for me alien number but they didn’t mention my spouse? This is correct and normal? Thank you again very much

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Jason Dzubow March 15, 2017 at 9:53 am

It seems to be happening more frequently now than it used to. I would not worry about it. But your spouse should get a fingerprint appointment. Take care, Jason

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gebreslasie March 14, 2017 at 8:34 pm

Hello Jason, I have emailed you yesterday but I can not find any reply to my email here in the comment section. I am forwarding you the same email again, please I need to hear some information from you.
My name is Gebre,
I have my family (my wife and my son, who was born after I get here) back in Eritrea. I applied asylum here in Texas houston, in November 20115. My child has been sick since he was born, my wife took him to almost all the highest hospitals but there is no change. Finally, they told her to take him to other countries for further diagnosis. They gave her medical referral paper. she sent it to me and I gave it to the asylum office, they called me for an interview right away. I did the interview in January 12, 2017 and it went very good. The officer told me that they will sent me the decision in 2 weeks, but it has been exactly 2 months and NOTHING! Then, I emailed them before 2 weeks and they told me I will get my result shortly, but I have no idea how long is “shortly” for them. I am emailing you if you can help me to figure out what the possible reason for the delay is and if there is anyway that I can facilitate this decision hearing process as I did for the interview. My child’s case is really scaring me, his situation is getting worse every day.
Your reply will be valuable for me.
Thanks for you time and reply in advance.

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Jason Dzubow March 15, 2017 at 6:31 am

Unfortunately, no one cannot predict when the decision will be issued or what “shortly” means. I suggest you contact them every few weeks about this. Also, even if you win, it takes months to bring a relative to the US based on an I-730. You may want to see if she can go to a third country for treatment during this time. Also, she could apply for a B visa (visitor visa) to the US for medical treatment. If it is denied, she can apply for humanitarian parole (form I-131, available at http://www.uscis.gov). I recommend that you find a lawyer to help with this. Good luck, Jason

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gebreslasie March 15, 2017 at 1:03 pm

Thanks Jason!

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Jean March 13, 2017 at 9:32 pm

Hello,
After receiving the asylum form, that says you can remain in the US until a decision is taken.how long should they take to call you for interview?
Thanks in advance for your answer an looking forward to hearing from you.

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Jason Dzubow March 14, 2017 at 6:33 am

It is unknown, as it depends on many factors. You can get some idea if you check the Asylum Office Scheduling Bulletin – a link is at right. Take care, Jason

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